Webinar – Part 2, March 31, 2021

The Science of Bias: How Cognition and Motivation Impact Judgment – Part 2

The New England Addiction Technology Transfer Center (ATTC), and the New England Association of Recovery Court Professionals (NEARCP), are hosting a new webinar for criminal justice professionals.

Many of us believe that we evaluate and treat people fairly. However, despite our best intentions, we often show bias – racial, gender, and otherwise – with profound effects on how we see and interact with the world around us. This session will consider socialpsychological strategies to reduce bias and its impact on decision-making and outcomes and discuss ways they might be implemented in organizational contexts. Attendees should be prepared to share and discuss knowledge of their organization’s existing guidelines, processes, and procedures that currently contribute to group-based disparities. Together, we will consider how strategies might be implemented to reduce these disparities.

Webinar – Part 1, Jan, 27th 2021

How Cognition and Motivation Impact Judgment

The New England Addiction Technology Transfer Center (ATTC), and the New England Association of Recovery Court Professionals (NEARCP), are hosting a new webinar for criminal justice professionals.

Many of us believe that we evaluate and treat people fairly. However, despite our best intentions, we often show bias – racial, gender, and otherwise – with profound effects on how we see and interact with the world around us. This interactive presentation will explore the science of implicit bias, discuss the challenges it presents for decision-making, and consider strategies to mitigate its impact.

Continuing Education

This webinar has been approved by the New England Addiction Technology Transfer Center, as a National Association of Alcohol and Drug Abuse Counselors (NAADAC) Approved Education Provider, for 1.5 educational credit (CE), NAADAC Provider #62652.

Webinar Sponsors

Session Time: 12:00-1:30 PM (EST)

There are no fees for this Webinar, registration is limited

Keith B. Maddox, Ph.D.